Faith and womanhood in 21st century London

Catholic and the City

My journey into entrepreneurship

The Girl Boss' Diary

The balance between tradition and modernity

Modern Day Tory

    Secret Diary

    The US Presidential Elections


    When you are involved in political circles, it’s not rare to find the person who is so invested in politics in general that they will follow with the utmost interest the elections in any country that has any elections going, but when it comes to the US the interest is so predominant it almost feels like a prerequisite of being political. However, despite a nearly life-long admiration for a Dr Timothy Stanley and an essay on US foreign policy in the Bush Jr era under my belt, I have no interest in the affairs of the Thirteen Colonies after 1776. In fact, I wrote another paper on American history and managed to make it entirely about the British government of the 1770s.

    This year, after my bae Marco Rubio has failed to become the Republican nominee, my disinterest in the election has only grown. These are my very valid reasons to hold my friend Phil, who is forcing me to pull an all-nighter at an election night with him, as “owing me one” for the rest of his life

    Trump running is a trigger for a minor form of PTSD
    I have recently been accused of having been indoctrinated by the leftie school system and buying into everything I read in the Guardian for sharing (on FB) an article which made a comparison between Donald Trump and the king of bunga bunga Silvio Berlusconi. Never mind that last time I checked Berlusconi had been in power for most of my lifetime in the country where I have spent a considerable amount of the time in question. I’m not buying into what the Guardian says, I’m sad I couldn’t make a few quids out of being the one who wrote that article. I was there when old women said they voted for him because he was charming, and sensible people said they voted for him on the basis of an electoral promise he did not technically break, but it turned out to make everyone be taxed more than they were before said tax was abolished.
    Both Berlusconi and Trump are self-serving individuals who are bad business owners and are running on a populist platform thinking they are so attractive and entitled to being liked and getting what they want. And actually, I have a bit more respect for Berlusconi, at least he ran to keep himself out of prison. I still don’t know why Trump ever wanted the job.

    I can’t take any more pro-life politics
    It’s not news that I believe in the right to life. I believe personhood should be universal because the moment you make it arbitrary then it could be anything, and we’ve seen that happen in genocides throughout history, or with slavery etc. Not upholding the right to life also makes a mockery of our talks of human rights and equality today, and all our talking about the great contribution of disabled people in our society when 90% of them don’t make it out of the womb. These are entirely secular arguments, and I have been as pro-life as an atheist than I have as a Catholic. However, it rubs me the wrong way that the debate is focused on the law so much, and especially that Catholics are the worst culprits of that. We’re supposed to be the ones who believe in an all-powerful God who has ultimately defeated evil, and yet people are calling for the excommunication of people who vote Democrat because the party runs on a pro-“choice” platform.

    People are trusting a man like Trump, who embodies exactly the kind of morality that makes abortion a thing, and never ruled out paying for abortions before, and was pro-abortion until he stood for president, just because as a Republican candidate he’s putting on a show and telling people what they want to hear. Meanwhile nobody is seemingly questioning the impact of other Republican policies on the fact that people have a demand for abortions.
    It’s simple economics, if there is a demand someone will provide. Unless you address the demand, changing the law to make abortion illegal will only make the provision illegal as well. We’re talking about a country that has, across the board, nearly no paid maternity leave, where access to healthcare isn’t as simple as just showing up at the door of the NHS and where social security makes you feel glad about that nightmare that is DWP. This isn’t a country that supports mothers or values life beyond the rhetoric about the law.

    I can see secular pro-lifers focusing on the law but the Church should be more aware that it is a moral question, not a political one, and therefore has a moral answer, which can be helped by political ones but ultimately God is bigger than the State. There’s a passage in Matthew 19 which recounts a time Jesus addressed the issue of divorce, making a distinction between what was lawful and what was moral. That’s why I personally feel more compelled to fight cultural battles in society rather than in the courts of the lawmakers.
    And the lack of compassion I’ve seen towards women who are often in very tragic circumstances by people who are supposed to see the image of God in everyone is disturbing.

    What’s the point in following something that is fought to find “the least of two evils”?
    Bar a number of committed supporters of each party, the impression is that a lot of people feel compelled to vote for an option to keep the other one out rather than backing a candidate and party half-wholeheartedly, unless they’re backing a 3rd party and being accused of not doing enough to stop the bad choice (whoever that is in the eyes of whoever is looking) from entering the White House. Minority interest groups have an easier time determining which one is the bad one, but even picking sides based on the fact I have ovaries I can’t jump on the foreign enthusiasm bandwagon because I still find the candidate representing that side to be problematic. There is no palpable sense of hope or aspiration when people are judging in terms of the least evil, and US Presidents as a rule are pretty bad for foreign policy one way or another. I can’t even find it in me to look at it from a “what’s good for us over here” perspective. So my feelings about this election are those of a stereotypical New York Jewish comedian. Meh.

    St Jude, pray for us.